Milestones

What should my child be able to do at 2-3 years old?

Hearing and Understanding

  • Understands differences in meaning (“go-stop,” “in-on,” “big-little,” “up-down”).
  • Follows two requests (“Get the book and put it on the table”).
  • Listens to and enjoys hearing stories for longer periods of time

Talking

  • Has a word for almost everything.
  • Uses two- or three- words to talk about and ask for things.
  • Uses k, g, f, t, d, and n sounds.
  • Speech is understood by familiar listeners most of the time.
  • Often asks for or directs attention to objects by naming them.

What should my child be able to do at 3-4 years old?

Hearing and Understanding

  • Hears you when you call from another room.
  • Hears television or radio at the same loudness level as other family members.
  • Answers simple “who?”, “what?”, “where?”, and “why?” questions.

Talking

  • Talks about activities at school or at friends’ homes.
  • People outside of the family usually understand child’s speech.
  • Uses a lot of sentences that have 4 or more words.
  • Usually talks easily without repeating syllables or words.

What should my child be able to do at 4-5 years old?

Hearing and Understanding

  • Pays attention to a short story and answers simple questions about them.
  • Hears and understands most of what is said at home and in school.

Talking

  • Uses sentences that give lots of details (“The biggest peach is mine”).
  • Tells stories that stick to topic.
  • Communicates easily with other children and adults.
  • Says most sounds correctly except a few like l, s, r, v, z, ch, sh, th.
  • Says rhyming words.
  • Names some letters and numbers.
  • Uses the same grammar as the rest of the family.

These guidelines are general expectations, and it’s important to remember that every child develops at their own pace.  Want to know more?  This information was obtained from The ASHA website, and you can find even more detailed information if you visit them at www.asha.org